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Create Better Vanity URLs: 8 Dos and 8 Don’ts

Follow these landing page guidelines for your vanity URLs so people can remember you and find you organically

vanity URLs

You know the importance of landing pages, but many people don’t know how important vanity URLs are. Vanity URLs that are too long, don’t make sense, or are hard to read can actually turn someone away, rather than attracting them to your site.

The most popular places to point a vanity URL are:

The most popular places you might see a vanity URL are:

A vanity URL redirects to the real URL. For example:

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You can use them on any promotional materials where you are externally pointing to the URL (likely in print) and hoping the reader will remember it. This would be common in a magazine ad, or some place where you’re not simply hyperlinking to the page online, but asking them to take note and visit it later on.

There are multiple reasons for creating vanity URLs, which goes beyond print:

Think of your vanity URL as if it was printed on the side of a van that’s driving down the highway. Other drivers need to be able to quickly read and remember this URL even if they don’t have the ability to write it down.

The Dos of Vanity URLs

Although not used promotionally, you can create vanity URLs for your homepage if you believe your target audience has a variety of nicknames for you, or misspells your name often. For example, we own miquoda.com, which redirects to mequoda.com.

The Don’ts of Vanity URLs

The most important point here is to think about both convenience and overall marketing when choosing a vanity URL for your landing page. But what about you? Do you have any do’s or don’ts that we’ve overlooked?

This post was originally published in 2010 and is continually updated.