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Tag: publishing startups

How to Start an Online Magazine from Scratch

Although we work with many established legacy publishers, we also work with publishing startups. In fact, these startups benefit from our years of work with legacy publishers teaching them how to start an online magazine. Meanwhile startups can teach a thing or two to the digital retread legacy publishers.

If you’re a publishing startup, or are getting into the business of publishing, then an online magazine probably isn’t on your mind. To be clear, an online magazine is a web-friendly version of your magazine. It’s in HTML and works like a website. It cannot be held in your hand, unless you’re in the web browser of a tablet.

How to Start a Magazine and Publish it Profitably

How to start a magazine and publish it profitably, without requiring a large team to start.
In her book How Not to Start a Magazine, B. Ann Bell says the number one way new magazines fail is through poor budget planning. Poor planning for printing, postage, and marketing are among the top expenses in her book, originally published

17 Tips for Starting a Membership Website

The answers are not always obvious, even to a seasoned print or digital publisher. Starting a new website is very different from running an existing property. Over the past 10 years, our team has worked on over 100 successful digital publishing startups, as well as several that were not successful.

Our understanding of website publishing is rooted in the world of print, which has given us insight into the similarities and differences between the two types of launches. These tips will document the best practices we’ve seen, and been part of, over the past decade. These tips are geared toward a website that will generate $2 to $5 million per year in total revenues after three to five years.

Publishing Startups Making an Impact

Digiday recently profiled four digital startups that are deftly navigating the occasionally dangerous waters of publishing: Skift, The Information, The Daily Dot, and Mic.