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Tag: usability tests

Usability Testing: 5 Heat Map Tracking Tools to Watch What Your Visitors Do

If you want to know why your website is, or is not performing, start conducting usability studies. A/B tests are great for content, but when it comes to seeing how users engage with your website, online heatmap tracking tools can make all the difference.

Mequoda’s Top 10 Subscription Website Publishing Posts of 2017

Our most-read subscription website publishing posts of last year show a continued interest in building profitable subscription websites and improving their speed and ranking.
Last year, publishers focused on increasing profitability through apps and subscription website publishing. As publishers continue to search for digital content success through subscriptions, we think the chosen top ten most-read posts

Simple Types of Usability Tests for Creating Happier Users and Better Websites

Even though you might associate usability with website design, it’s been an important factor in our everyday life for at least a century. Frederick Taylor’s Principles of Scientific Management, published in 1911, is the first instance where the world started paying attention to how people use things, and how we can help them be more efficient. In 1936, Frigidaire cited “usability” as a key feature of their new refrigerator. In 1943, Alphonse Chapanis made the case for redesigning airplane cockpits in order to reduce errors.

But it wasn’t until 1985 that Computer Usability Testing & Evaluation was published by Richard Spencer. Of course, by this point, usability wasn’t anything new, so designing computers that were most usable was a given. In fact, the war of operating systems, mainly between Microsoft and Apple, has been centered on usability since the beginning.

When home-accessible Internet arrived and websites became the next usability feat, Steve Krug published Don’t Make Me Think in 2000. I think we can all agree that web designers everywhere desperately needed this book back in 2000 and the web has become better for it.

Mequoda’s Top Subscription Website Publishing Posts of 2016

Our most-read subscription website publishing posts of last year show an interest in building profitable subscription websites and improving the usability and site speed of existing websites.
In 2016, toward the end of the year it was made abundantly clear to publishers they would need to focus on more simple site design with faster loading times.

10 Top Subscription Website Publishing Posts of 2015

Our most-read subscription website publishing posts of 2015 reveal a desire for better understanding of building, publishing and pricing subscription websites
This year in our Subscription Website Publishing articles we’ve tackled everything from choosing profitable subscription models, to choosing the best colors and fonts for your redesign, and pricing your subscription websites appropriately. However, there are a

5 Signs of Bad Website Design & How to Fix

Websites are not magazines (most of the time). However, magazine content can be the basis of a successful periodical website that follows the basic rules of periodical website design and content management.

Get More Subscribers: Top 8 Reasons Why Visitors Resist Subscribing to Your Website

Do new visitors to your site subscribe, or do they take one quick look, then click back to where they came from? Here are the top 10 reasons your visitors may not be converting to subscribers.

8 Subscription Website Homepage Ideas for Audience Engagement

These subscription website homepage ideas will help you provide a better user experience through website design

Mequoda has long quantified its own best subscription website homepage ideas, which we put into action with all of our clients. Having recently launched two brand-new websites and re-launched a third, this is an excellent opportunity to show you how we put our subscription website homepage ideas into action.

What Great Website Design Actually Means and How to Measure it

Have you started the venture on your next great website design? Maybe your original design was pretty great when you launched, but it’s been a few years now and it’s not so great. What exactly is the definition of great, anyway? Is it a good color pallette? A fancy design? Does it shuffle content more effectively, or draw your eye to the most important calls to action? Does it generate revenue for you? Has it been effective at building an email list? Are you consistently seeing more revenue generated through it than the month before?

You can probably guess at which of these questions are more important than others. If we have to hear another new marketing intern complain about pop-ups without looking at the 20-30% increase in email captures when they launched, we’re going to go all Nate Silver on them. Business goals – do you have them? Good. Are you willing to do what it takes to reach them? Great.

What Every Great Website Design Requires (And You Might Be Missing)

I’d like you to take a minute and decide the actions you’d like a user to take when they arrive at your website. If you were conducting any kind of simple usability tests, you’d want to do the same thing.

In a heuristic usability test, where you’re watching a user engage with your website, you are required to come up with 5-10 major tasks, many of which require the one element that every website design requires: a very obvious call to action.

5 Ways Your Website Taxonomy Should Work For You

If your website taxonomy is perfect, it means that your readers are never confused by the language on your site. It means they know what they’re clicking on and subscribing to, or unsubscribing to, based on the words you use. We often focus the taxonomy conversation around the primary website navigation, usually at the top of your site. But your entire website is full of the taxonomy you chose, like buttons and links in your footer.

The Battle for Best Website Design Lies in These 16 Questions

No matter how many website awards there are out there, no one website could ever win the battle for best website design of all, because there are so many factors that come into play.

For example, some might think they have the best website design because their website is “pretty,” with loads of white space and great fonts. But if it’s not also search-optimized for someone to find it, then who cares? Another example is a site that’s completely search-optimized, even user-friendly – but there’s not a single call to action to be found. What’s the point?

Mequoda Weekly: March 25th, 2013 – March 29th, 2013

Catch up on the Mequoda Daily’s blog posts for this past week

Merging Usability Testing Methods from the Past and Present

Website usability tests are performed to determine if websites are functioning correctly. If they aren’t, users will have a hard time executing on their desired tasks, leading website publishers to fail in building rapport and generating revenue from these users.

Mobile Site Design Focuses on Usability

Don’t be fooled; there is a proper way to design for mobile.

I once read an article that claimed there was no such thing as mobile websites, because all websites were already mobile.

I hope the person who wrote that article doesn’t design sites for a living, or his clientele won’t last very long.

Three Ways to Maximize Website Usability

Website usability tests are performed to determine if websites are functioning correctly. If they aren’t, users will have a hard time executing on their desired tasks, leading website publishers to fail in building rapport and generating revenue from these users.

There are three basic approaches to usability testing. They include expert reviews, heuristic testing and usability labs.

In an expert review, usability problems associated with a product’s interactivity are identified and diagnosed without the involvement of users. For example, malfunctioning links or contrast issues are a few of the problems that an expert review can easily find.

Mobile Site Design for Content Publishers Free Report Released

Strategies for usability, design and content distribution

SIPA Take Away #1: 17 Testing Tools from Sandra Niehaus

17 Usability, Card Sorting, A/B and Multivariate Testing Tools from Sandra Niehaus

Optimize Your Masthead for First-Time Visitors

Telling users who you are and what you do with your tagline or welcome blurb front and center

Mobile Usability Testing

Mobile usability tests encourage distractions and an unstable environment. Like any website you’ll ever build, there is a need for usability testing. Building a site for mobile users is like shooting in the dark unless you know what they’re looking at and what they’re viewing it on.

How to Evaluate your Usability Lab Results

Identifying and prioritizing your usability lab results is the most interesting and valuable part

Once you conduct your usability lab, it will become very obvious to you very quickly, which areas need improvement. More often than not, there will be more than one user who will experience frustration with certain tasks on your website.

How to Conduct a Usability Lab

How to prepare a usability lab for several different types of studies. Usability testing is a controlled experiment that tests the architecture and user-friendliness of your website. Reasons why businesses conduct usability tests are often to provide feedback to information architects and designers.