Get Free Email Updates | Have an Account?
  • Free email newsletter
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • RSS Feed

Archive for Digital Publishing Trends

We have seen the popularity of the iPad and similar tablet devices within their infancy. We’ve also seen the mobile device market explode. These trends will continue to evolve. In order to utilize the popularity behind these technological advances, it’s important to know who and what you’re really developing your magazine for. Our Digital Publishing Trends posts capture what’s happening in the digital publishing world.

Free Download: Consumers are telling us loud and clear what they want—are you listening? How much would you pay for that information? To find out how you can improve your digital magazine rapport with subscribers, claim your FREE digital copy of our 2018 Mequoda Magazine Consumer Study, today.

Subscribe to Digital Publishing Trends posts in your RSS reader to be alerted every time we post a new Digital Publishing Trends article. What is an RSS Feed?

Mag+’s New Partnership Adds Relationship Management

We’ve been working with Mag+ a bunch lately, so their new partnership with Appboy is pretty exciting. According to Kara Udziela, PR manager for Mag+, “the partnership enables Mag+ clients to create rich user profiles of their readers, segment them into different cohorts and then send automated, multi-channel messages that increase reader engagement and facilitate purchases.”   Continue

The Digital Gap Remains For Most Publications

The latest PPA figures are out. So how did digital magazines fare? The Guardian has all the details. Ami Sedghi writes, “At first glance some of the figures look very promising. Monthly title, BBC History, has recorded an astonishing 693% rise in digital circulation on the year and fashion bible, Vogue, has seen theirs jump up by just over 463%.” But it turns out that when compared to their print circulation, digital editions are a tiny portion of overall circulation. Sedghi adds:   Continue

Vogue, Allure, and New Yorker Blossom in Print, E-Commerce and Blogging

The Guardian has a full report on how the luxury titles at Conde’ Nast have been performing. Josh Halliday reports,”Thumping in at 430 pages, the September issue of Vogue is the largest since the financial crash of 2008. More significantly, it carries more advertising than any edition in the past five years, with 272 pages bought by luxury brands including Ralph Lauren, Gucci and Dior. Is this a return to the boom-time at Vogue House?”   Continue

Non-Traditional Partnerships Become a Hot Digital Publishing Trend

Non-traditional partnerships have really become a hot digital publishing trend in the last month. These sort of retail-food-publishing partnerships are one of the hottest new digital publishing trends. Oh, and electronic cigarettes, Playboy covered those too.   Continue

Research Confirms People Consume Print + Digital at the Same Pace

Campaign Magazine has the details on a new study released by Conde Nast comparing the dwell times between print and digital content.   Continue

InStyle Goes Retail With Nine West

Another savvy publishing partnership to report. USA Today reports that InStyle Magazine and Nine West are collaborating on a new shoe line. According to Olivia Barker, “The flippable fashion fixture is going off the page and offline, collaborating with Nine West on a collection of pumps, flats and booties priced from $79 to $149.   Continue

NFL Finds New Audience in Marie Claire Readers

The NFL has a creative ad campaign in store for female magazine readers. AdAge reports that the NFL will be running a 16-page insert called “The Savvy Girl’s Guide to Football” in Marie Claire’s September issue. Michael Sebastian reporting for AdAge says, “The NFL is working with seven other women’s magazines, including Vogue, Cosmopolitan and Us Weekly. But the Marie Claire effort is the centerpiece of the NFL’s print campaign this year … they declined to disclose the spending involved.”
  Continue

Wait, Who Bought Newsweek?

Even though Jeff Bezos’ purchase this week knocked them out of the spotlight, a relatively unknown company, IBT, publisher of IBTimes.com bought Newsweek. What nobody is failing to mention in their news reports is that when they Tweeted about the acquisition, they only got one re-tweet and it was from someone else at IBT. So, if you measure popularity by Twitter influence, these guys are relatively unknown even though their company does have a cool 19k followers.   Continue

Times Says Magazines Lose Print Readers But Gain Digital Readers

The New York Times has a new report on magazine subscription and newsstand sales. Christine Haughney writing for The Times reports, “Magazines continued to struggle with sales of subscriptions and newsstand copies in the first half of 2013, but they made inroads in selling digital editions, according to data released on Tuesday.” Women’s magazines and celebrity weeklies were the hit the hardest as they try to compete with online outlets.   Continue

Bezos Signals the Changing of the Guard?

The Washington Post Company has agreed to sell its namesake newspaper and affiliated publications to Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon.com for 250 million in cash. Bezos will be the sole owner of The Washington Post and it will go back to being a privately held company once the deal goes through.
  Continue

Newsweek and Boston Globe Sold

Newsweek was sold over the weekend to IBT Media, reports Capital New York. “IAC/InterActive reached a deal to sell Newsweek, which has been publishing since January as a digital-only version of the old magazine, to the owners of the International Business Times.” IBT Media has stated that Newsweek will remain a digital-only publication.   Continue

The World’s Most Interesting Paywall?

In one of the most interesting paywall experiments we’ve ever seen, there’s a new article on what The Sun is up to.

“The company is launching a new digital subscription package today that turns their online website into a Paywall, where you have to take out a membership to read their articles. What is very exciting, is how the Sun is taking a departure from the standard way news companies make money online and doing some fairly innovative things.”   Continue

Comments Get an Upgrade at the NY Times

The New York Times has started experimenting with its placement of comments, reports Journalism.co.uk.

Marc Lavallee, a deputy editor of interactive news at the New York Times said, “the comments were elevated from below the line, placed alongside the story in a similar style to how New York Times’ much-discussed Snowfall presentation uses pull quotes and and visual pointers alongside the main narrative.”   Continue

Publishers Manage the Multiplatform Puzzle

Publishers are taking a great deal of time and research to get multiplatform publishing right. FOLIO Magazine took the pulse of a couple publishers to see what steps publishers like Rodale are taking to make the shift to multiplatform publishing easier.   Continue

WSJ Launches First-Person Videos, Also Combats Unseen Ads Effectively

The Wall Street Journal has started to produce new first-person interactive videos, reports Journalism.co.uk. The first interactive video to be released details the “changes to the US healthcare system under the Affordable Care Act”. Author Sarah Marshall reports, “told from a first-person perspective with a headcam providing a point-of-view (POV) shot, the video allows users to click and explore different aspects of the story, such as related graphics, articles and videos.”   Continue

Is it Facelift Week in Magazine Land?

The New York Times is reporting that Jet Magazine will be receiving a print and website redesign. This will be the first print redesign for Jet in 62 years. “The new look for Jet includes brighter colors against a white background, more informational graphics, larger photos and new fonts.”   Continue

Publishers Add Sponsored Tweets into Ad Packages

Publishers are jumping on board the sponsored Tweet bandwagon, reports Digiday. “In addition to the AP, publishers as diverse as People Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Women’s Wear Daily and Slate have given sponsored social content a whirl in the interest of scratching up new revenue. It makes sense. With millions of followers, Twitter is a powerful distribution platform for them. Every little bit helps. The risk, of course, is user backlash.”   Continue

Alerts Increase Open Rates, Tech Blogs = Trade Pubs and Time Inc’s New CEO

MarketingpProfs has new research dedicated to the most effective words in email subject lines. In the study, performed by British marketing firm Adestra, “Emails with the word “alert” in their subject lines have a 38.1% higher than average open rate and 61.8% higher click rate”.
  Continue

Biggest ‘Ad Page Contest’ in 5 Years

Adweek reports that Condé Nast has had their biggest September for ad page sales in 5 years. Each year the ad page contest is held to see how many ad pages are sold in the September issues of certain publications. The contest is seen as a measurement for how the industry is doing. Adweek reports that, “The Condé Nast book weighed in last year at 658 ad pages; this year, publisher Susan Plagemann added 1 percentage point for a total of 665 total ad pages. That marks four issues in a row of growth and Vogue’s second largest issue ever, (2007 remains the record-breaker with 725 ad pages, but that number included a Fashion Rocks supplement.)”   Continue

Keeping Comments Civil via Social Media

Publications have always battled to tame the comment sections of their websites. Social media has emerged as a solution that provides authenticity and civility to heated online discussions. Poynter just released a detailed report on how media outlets have made the transition to socially gating their comment sections.

ESPN.com made such a transition yesterday, says Poynter: “Patrick Stiegman, editor-in-chief of ESPN.com, said by phone that three factors drove the company’s decision to switch to Facebook for commenting: ‘a tremendously smooth transition for fans,’ many of whom already have Facebook accounts; increased visibility for ESPN content beyond the walls of ESPN.com; and a desire to ’emphasize quality of comments over the quantity of comments.'”   Continue

Big Reveals in SEO and Promising Changes for Tablet Publishers

Publishers using Adobe DPS for their magazine apps should be thrilled that their most recent update includes the ability for users of the app to “pin” their favorite articles. If you’re using the platform and are a craft or food publisher, especially. Additionally, they’ve added GPS abilities which makes for some pretty creative advertising opportunities. In theory, a publisher could set ads to display by certain advertisers in different cities. Or, if you’re a location-specific publisher (like Seattle Weekly or Rhode Island Magazine) you can display certain content based on location.   Continue

Native Ads Aren’t New, Time to Ditch Yahoo Accounts, Advertisers Get Picky

All this hype about native ads gave us a chuckle in yesterday’s weekly Mequoda editorial meeting. In case everybody’s forgotten, native ads aren’t new, a fad, or even advertising’s hottest thing. Remember advertorials? Magazines have been selling them, and publishing them, for decades! Digiday’s interpretation made me laugh, saying the name switch is like “putting lipstick on the advertorial pig.” Some would disagree because the ads are supposed to replace traditional online advertising, but AdWeek editor Mike Shields tweeted early on, saying “we’ve had ‘sponsored sections’ since 90s. Ditching banners is what’s revolutionary.”   Continue

AllRecipes.com Already Sold 400,000 Subscriptions to New Print Mag

Digital publishing news for Monday, July 15, 2013
Even though print magazine launches are down, AllRecipes.com has stepped up to the plate and decided to come out with one of their own. AllRecipes.com is a leading recipe website, usually showing up on the front page for just about any recipe you could possibly search on the   Continue

Apple, Newsweek and Rupert Murdock Are Having a Bad Week

TabTimes is reporting that Apple has been found guilty of “conspiring with publishers to fix the price of electronic books, dating far back as 2009”.

“The five publishers charged in the case – Hachette, HarperCollins, Holtzbrinck, Simon & Schuster and the Penguin Group – have since reached settlements with the U.S. Department of Justice, but Apple will now be forced to wait until a new hearing determines what damages it must pay,” TT reports. The current pricing model lets publishers set the price and then gives them a 30% cut of the sales while Apple takes 70%. Apple plans to fight the verdict.   Continue

Nook Puts B&N in a Tight Spot + Harper’s Goes Digital

Barnes & Noble is in a tight spot with their Nook Book reader. Motley Fool dissects their latest quarterly results, saying “in the company’s most recent results, sales from Barnes & Noble’s Nook business plunged 34% year-over-year, while revenue from Barnes & Noble Retail, including BN.Com, declined 10% from the same period a year ago. The 34% decline in Nook sales follows the 26% fall reported in the company’s FQ3, ended January 31.”
  Continue

Publishers Bridge the Gap Between Magazines and Advertisers

Contextual ads are getting easier and easier for tablet editions. According to Neiman Journalism Lab, “Three-year-old ShopAdvisor is creating a next generation of editorial/advertising links in a number of Time Inc. and Hearst magazines, with more clients on the way.”

The technology allows ads in the tablet editions of magazines, like Cosmo, to have ads or an editorial for “20 hot accessories for summer” and a little button that says “Shop This Ad” which allows users to click and buy any of the items in the ad or save them for later.   Continue

Businessweek Mixes up Infographics and Storytelling

Bloomberg Businessweek has been trying their hand at building loyalty lately through a few different personas (including an insulting shot at millennials). Their newest attempt at storytelling includes Cover Trails. According to Media Bistro, “Cover Trails are the mini-story behind how each week’s cover was made. It features thoughts from Businessweek’s editor-in-chief Josh Tyrangiel and creative director Richard Turley, ideas that were canned, and much more.” Paper trail … cover trail … get it?   Continue

The Netflix of Magazine Subscriptions Now Has 100ish Titles

Next Issue, basically a Netflix for magazines subscriptions, now has over 100 titles. For $14.99 a month people get access to about 93 different publications and growing quickly. Bloomberg Businessweek, People and The New Yorker are just few of the publications available on the service. Their platform works on tablets and PCs. StackSocial, an eCommerce platform for tech publishers, is offering a two-month subscription to Next Issue Premium for free.
  Continue

Magazine Publishers to Leverage Print on Demand?

New print on demand opportunities are were presented to magazine publishers at Retail Marketplace 2013 according to IPDA Publishing & Retail news. Ingram Content Group (ICG) presented options to help magazine publishers leverage their print on demand technology.

Karlene Lukovitz reports, “ICG’s core premise: Since POD print (and digital) products are created and fulfilled to match supply with demand (one-offs based on prepaid consumer orders or publisher-determined small numbers of copies)–and the publisher’s cost and profit margin are predetermined–POD capabilities minimize waste copies/costs, while enabling sales to new (including global) markets/customers. ICG also believes there is potential for employing POD in traditional retail channels.”   Continue

Salon Media Group Makes Cuts, Boosts Web Traffic + Revenues

Digital publishing news for July 1, 2013
Salon Media Group saw increased revenue Q1 due to a nice boost in Web traffic reports Folio: “Salon is up 21 percent in net revenue from continuing operations when comparing Q1 2013 to Q1 2012, which totals about $900,000.” Due to the web traffic increase, their ad revenues and third-party ad revenues soared 10% and 23% respectively. Salon also made strategic cuts in both video production and their subscription model which also bolstered their financials.   Continue

Print and Online Publishers are Trading Cards Like Nobody’s Business

IDG and LinkedIn are getting cozy with a partnership that will help LinkedIn expand their content development efforts. “Under a ‘Hosted Technology Group’ program, IDG will set up a LinkedIn group based on any number of IT market verticals, such as virtualization, mobile, cloud computing, and so on,” reports FOLIO. “Marketers can sign on for a one-year exclusive sponsorship of the group. Services include a dedicated IDG group manager, daily content, curated and managed discussion topics, ad placements and client-originated content marketing opportunities.”   Continue

Publishers Must Disclose Sponsored Content – Google Says So

Google recently let publishers know that they’ll be scrutinizing advertorial content more closely in the future. Publishers need to make it abundantly clear to readers as to which pieces of content are sponsored. So how are other publishers handling this?

Digiday investigated how four digital publishers are disclosing sponsored content to their readers. One publisher they looked at was MIT Technology Review. “Technology Review has a devoted URL to its sponsored content guidelines and in clear language explains that material from advertisers is always unambiguously labeled, and the sponsor is always clearly identified,” writes Digiday.   Continue

Co-Created Editorial Content Winning Over Readers

Possibly inspired by social media and user-generated content, there’s an emerging trend in publishing and that’s co-created magazine content. PBS reports that “global media publisher Bonner Group is experimenting with co-creation at Olivia, an established women’s magazine in Finland with a readership of about 130,000.” I’ve seen user-generated magazine issues before at publications like Budget Travel, but never a system like this.

“In 2011, Olivia launched its co-creation platform, MyOwnOlivia (Oma Olivia), on which readers and journalists collaborate to produce feature stories in a sequenced and systematic but open process. Readers and journalists pursue stories together, and those stories are published in the print issues of Olivia magazine,” writes Tanja Aitamurto. The whole creation process is really fascinating with game-like challenges, and they’re finding that the most important thing to the users is that they’re “heard”by the editors. Keep reading the article and also the study it was based on.   Continue

NYTimes Introduces Metered System to Mobile Users This Week

On June 27th, The New York Times will implement the same metered system it uses on the web to its mobile users. The metered system allows non-subscribers access to three articles per day, but if the reader wishes to read more than three, they will be asked to subscribe. For now, video will remain free, but content will be limited.
  Continue

Digital Publishing Pays Off in Ads, Paywalls, and Digital Issues

Adobe DPS software has distributed over 100 million digital issues since their launch in 2011 reports Adobe’s Digital Publishing Blog. “We are not just seeing a rise in magazine and newspaper readership on mobile devices, but also significant growth in corporate adoption of Digital Publishing Suite” states post author, Teresa Demel. This a quite an achievement for a digital publishing platform and just one more indicator that people are consuming more digital content.   Continue

More Digital Magazines Hit the Newsstand as Tablet Ownership Rises

According to Pew Internet & American Life Project’s May survey, tablet ownership is on the rise and looks like a trend that’s going to continue. In the month of May, out of the people surveyed, 34% owned a tablet.

The largest increase was seen with people between the ages of 30 and 49, with almost 50% of people in this age group reporting tablet ownership. All age groups from 18-65 regardless of race or income have seen significant growth in tablet ownership from November 2010 to May 2013 at a pretty high rate. The iPad still takes the cake with 53% of the tablet market, while Amazon’s Kindle Fire makes up for 31% and the Samsung Galaxy making up for 19%.   Continue

Newspapers Decline as Magazines Rise

According to PwC, as reported by Subscription Site Central, “The US newspaper industry is expected to decline by 2.5% over the next five years, while the music and consumer magazine industries are holding steady, and the business-to-business information market is expected to grow by 2.5%.”

Specifically, the 2% adoption rate of digital magazines will soar to 12% by 2017. We said a little something like that in our Tablet Study, just saying.   Continue

The Atlantic Takes Digital Publishing to a Weekly Frequency

The Atlantic Weekly debuts on Friday and will feature content from the print magazine and website on a weekly basis. Individual weekly copies will go for $1.99 on Apple Newsstand and monthly subscriptions will run for $2.99, while yearly subscriptions will go for $19.99. New issues will be released every Friday.

Rather than create new content, they will pull   Continue

News Flash, Magazines Are Not Failing!

In a recent article over on Magazine.org by Mary Berner, she states that Becky Lang is dead wrong about the future of magazines with a multitude of statistics that say the complete opposite. Print magazines audiences are up by 1.3 percent and tablet magazine audiences are up by a whopping 47.5 percent. She sites that 50 percent of readers ages 18 to 34 are following some sort of writer, whether it be a specific brand or writer/editor on Twitter.   Continue

Site Speed Makes Website Traffic Analytics Happy

Site Speed Most Important for SEO?
A recent article published over on Brafton.com reports that news content readers say they won’t read your website if it isn’t fast. With 47 percent of mobile users using mobile sites and apps to read news content, four out of 10 say site speed is the most important aspect of their   Continue

Time Inc. to go with New “Double-Snap” Advertising

Time has decided to make advertising a little more interactive and creative with a new Double Snap model. The ad would start as a regular Toyota banner at the top, and as you scroll down the ad will “snap” into a larger interactive ad, then as you scroll further, the ad will move out of the way.   Continue

National Geographic Merges Print and Digital Content

National Geographic has merged all their content in a attempt to “increase publication frequency.” The move was sparked by the fact that Nat Geo has created stories across all platforms (print, digital, video) that it became quintessential to have everything under the same leadership.

Chris Johns has been named Executive Vice President and Editorial Group Director, while still remaining Editor in Chief – a role he’s had since 2005. In addition, Matt Mansfield will take over as the Executive Editor of Digital Content, Keith Jenkins as the Director of Photography and Mike Schmidt as the Multimedia Director.   Continue

Apple Newsstand on the Rise

Apple Newsstand is making it easier and more efficient for magazine and newspaper lovers worldwide to gain access to their favorite reads.

Simon Wainwright conducted research on how consumers are adapting to the digital age and what it means for the future. While the US still dominates the market with around 42 percent of purchases in Newsstand, that still leaves 58 percent of the market to the rest of the world, with 17 percent coming from the UK. The search function is one of the biggest problems users have with the Newsstand claims Wainwright, saying “it can be a struggle for users to find exactly what they want.”

The biggest pro the Newsstand has going for it is the fact that content is updated faster. Instead of one magazine per month, there might be new content available weekly or even daily. Instead of going to the store, you can just tap “download”.   Continue