Get Free Email Updates | Have an Account?
  • Free email newsletter
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • RSS Feed

Tag: the onion

What Is Native Advertising and Its Impact on Consumers?

We’ve covered the question “What is native advertising?” several times, stressing that it’s not a new component of publishing revenue, but rather a fresh take on advertorial for the digital age. Another term for it? Sponsored content. In other words, content that brands craft themselves to resemble surrounding magazine content and then pay for placement, or content that brands pay the magazine’s in-house studio to create plus place. This includes article-like text, video, infographics, and more. One important caveat here is that brands – or the publishers they’re paying, for that matter – cannot, by law, mislead consumers. That line has been bent, stretched, blurred, and seemingly redrawn over the years, with various parties weighing in. But rarely have we had the opportunity to hear what readers actually think about the native ads they’re expected to digest. MinOnline reports on a recent study that provides just such an opportunity. Let’s start there today!

Digital Advertising News: Buyers Want Viewability Data, While Nielsen Wants Brains

All roads lead to viewability. This is not digital advertising news for anyone paying attention. Without it – or without a plan to establish it – publishers could be in some trouble, particularly on mobile. Advertising Age examines the issue in a couple of recent articles, while ruminating on sponsored content in a couple of others. Bonus content: Some big news from USA Today.

Is Niche Publishing the Secret of Atlantic Media’s Success?

Another week, another new social platform! Plus more video models and one of our favorite topics: niche publishing.

Let’s take a look at three articles tackling these trends from the always timely Digiday.

How The Onion Finds Digital Publishing Success

Digital publishing success is based on a few things, with audience being a major factor. You have to find your audience, make sure they know you exist, and present them with the right kind of content.

Latest Moves: Magazine Publishing Teams Shift

Keith J. Kelly’s “Media Ink” column in the New York Post has included a lot of comings and goings lately.

The Onion’s Digital Magazine Prevails Over Print

On November 8, The Onion announced that it would stop publishing in print and only focus on its digital channels. On Thursday, December 12, the final print edition of The Onion hit newsstands with its typical satirical glow.

Magazine Publishers to Leverage Print on Demand?

New print on demand opportunities are were presented to magazine publishers at Retail Marketplace 2013 according to IPDA Publishing & Retail news. Ingram Content Group (ICG) presented options to help magazine publishers leverage their print on demand technology.

Karlene Lukovitz reports, “ICG’s core premise: Since POD print (and digital) products are created and fulfilled to match supply with demand (one-offs based on prepaid consumer orders or publisher-determined small numbers of copies)–and the publisher’s cost and profit margin are predetermined–POD capabilities minimize waste copies/costs, while enabling sales to new (including global) markets/customers. ICG also believes there is potential for employing POD in traditional retail channels.”

Mequoda Weekly: March 18th, 2013 – March 22nd, 2013

Catch up on the Mequoda Daily’s blog posts for this past week

3 Reasons to Add the New Tweet Button And Increase Inbound Links

How can the new Tweet Button increase inbound links, audience development efforts, and increase website traffic?

Twitter proudly announced its own share button last month. The option to retweet information has definitely made it easier for publishers to share their content on Twitter and contributed to Twitter’s continued growth.

How much do we retweet? More than 750 million daily retweet button impressions using TweetMeme alone. The new “Tweet Button” is similar to TweetMeme’s “retweet button”, with whom they are working closely with on this project, with 3 key differences.

The 2009 Mequoda Hotlist

The 2009 Mequoda Hotlist is our annual listing of the fastest growing Mequoda System Publishers in America. The multi-media publishers in the Mequoda Hotlist are used by the Mequoda Research Team to maintain the Mequoda System Best Practices for Successful Online Publishing & Marketing and are the base line for virtually all the content produced for Mequoda Daily, Mequoda Webinars, Mequoda Pro Seminars on Demand and all live Mequoda Summits and Workshops.

What Kindle Users Buy

The Kindle Wireless Reader has forever changed online publishing, for the better?

Ever wonder how many Kindles has Amazon sold to date? Apparently, that is the million dollar question. The general consensus is this: over 250,000 units sold in 2007, modest estimates of 500,000-750,000 units sold in 2008 and there was a quick sell out the new DX model in 2009. By our calculations, there are at least 1 million Kindles out there. Compare this to the Sony Reader which has sold just over 300,000 devices since the debut of the original Reader in 2006.

Podcasting for Publishers

How online publishers are using podcasts to expand their brand, increase customer loyalty and make more money online

Parks Associates predicts that by 2012, “broadband media” such as online streaming video, podcasts and ad-supported music and video download services will make up more than half ($6.6 billion) of the total ($12.6 billion) revenue the U.S. generates in advertising.

Successful podcast publishers distribute their podcasts at least once a week. If you’re the New York Times, it makes sense to distribute a daily podcast with today’s top headlines, however it’s certainly not necessary for the rest of us. While this article doesn’t focus on the content of a podcast, Furrier.org has a great article on content and production rules for podcasting.

Amazon’s Kindle, a wireless reading device, is sure to catch fire with early adopters.

But how will Kindle arouse long-term consumer interest when the Sony Reader hasn’t? The answer is in the online publishing strategy of the major news media.

On Monday (Nov. 19, 2007) Amazon.com introduced Amazon Kindle, a portable reader that wirelessly downloads books, blogs, magazines and newspapers to a crisp, high-resolution electronic paper display that looks and reads like real paper, even in bright sunlight.